• Plants & Gardening

    3 Beautiful Blue Plants That Will Survive a Heat Wave

    Blue Star Juniper and Ajuga, 3 Beautiful Blue Plants That Will Survive a Heat Wave, Karen Hugg, https://karenhugg.com/2022/07/13/blue-plants/(opens in a new tab) #plants #gardening #blueplants #droughttolerant #plantsforsun #toughplants #heatwave

    As much of the U.S. (and Europe) copes with warmer heat waves, you may be looking for plants that can thrive in hot sun. Blue plants often fit this profile since they create a waxy coating that protects them from hot sun and helps them hold water. And what’s even more enjoyable for us is that waxy coating makes them appear blue, thus creating an unusually pretty accent in the garden.

    So if you want a tough, interesting looking plant, try these three below. They pair well with dark-leafed plants or boldy colored perennials.

    Blue Star Juniper
    Blue Star Juniper, 3 Beautiful Blue Plants That Will Survive a Heat Wave, Karen Hugg, https://karenhugg.com/2022/07/13/blue-plants/(opens in a new tab) #plants #gardening #blueplants #droughttolerant #plantsforsun #toughplants #heatwave

    I love this little sub-shrub because it’s hardy down to zone 4, evergreen, and wonderfully dense in its foliage. That means it shades weeds out easily. Juniperus squamata ‘Blue Star’ also requires very little supplemental water, which is handy if you’re planting a city parking strip or rock garden. Also, it won’t grow beyond about a foot or so in height but spreads gently in all directions. I have five lining the front of a sunny perennial bed and they work well with purple sedums, ajuga, or salvias (see top photo).

    Blue Surprise Falsecypress
    Blue Surprise Falsecypress, 3 Beautiful Blue Plants That Will Survive a Heat Wave, Karen Hugg, https://karenhugg.com/2022/07/13/blue-plants/(opens in a new tab) #plants #gardening #blueplants #droughttolerant #plantsforsun #toughplants #heatwave

    Blue Surprise False Cypress (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana ‘Blue Surprise’) is a small evergreen tree that stuns in the landscape. It’s bluer in color than vertical juniper trees, albeit those are pretty too. But I like this tree because it’s very behaved in its form. You won’t ever need to prune it unless it creates a few dead lower branches. And it adds a lovely spire-like accent to a mixed shrub border. I have two flanking a small circular patio in an area blasted by hot sun. Hardy to zone 5 and gets to about 10 feet tall at maturity. Great for front entrances or where space is tight.

    Blue Limber Pine
    Blue Limber Pine, 3 Beautiful Blue Plants That Will Survive a Heat Wave, Karen Hugg, https://karenhugg.com/2022/07/13/blue-plants/(opens in a new tab) #plants #gardening #blueplants #droughttolerant #plantsforsun #toughplants #heatwave

    I normally don’t care for pine trees. They often drop needles and sometimes need pruning at the tips, but I love this Blue Limber Pine (Pinus flexilis ‘Cesarini Blue’). It grows in a small, puffy, pyramidal shape so it’s great for screening out unwanted views. Also, it’s hardy to zone 4 and can take dry areas. In fact, since it’s a pine, it will probably do better in a garden in Colorado with dryer, colder winters than in the rainy Pacific Northwest. At maturity, it tops out at 20 feet but during the first several years will hang out at around 10 feet. Unusual specimen.

    I realized in writing this that I happened to choose three conifers so in a future post, I’ll spotlight some blue-leafed perennials. I’m thinking hosta, euphorbia, rue, and more. Until then, happy planting!

  • Books,  Plants & Happiness

    Leaf Your Troubles Behind is Now Available for Sale!

    Leaf Your Troubles Behind Cover

    Hi everyone,

    Just a quick post to let you know Leaf Your Troubles Behind: How to Destress and Grow Happiness Through Plants is now available for sale. You can buy it at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and your local bookstore. Thank you so much for your support! This book started as a fun pandemic project that actually turned into a book. It’s aimed at helping you grow a happier in life. Also, read on for the three winners of the Leaf Your Troubles giveaway.

    I’m happy to share the winners of the giveaway are Alyssa, Jennifer, and Donna! Alyssa, Jennifer, and Donna, please read your latest newsletter email for details on how to get your paperback copy.

    And if you didn’t win, don’t worry. I’m giving away a few more copies on Goodreads! But the offer ends in 7 days so click here for details.

    Leaf Your Troubles Workbook, The Leaf Your Troubles Workbook is Ready and Free!, Karen Hugg, https://karenhugg.com/2022/07/12/leaf-your-troubles-workbook/(opens in a new tab), #leafyourtroubles #workbook #greenleisure #journal #happiness #mentalhealth #stressrelief #nature
    Companion Workbook

    Finally, don’t forget that I’ve created a companion workbook, which you can download by clicking here. Until next time, have a great day and don’t forget to relax with a plant!

    Karen Hugg, sig, http://www.karenhugg.com #author #books #fiction #Paris #journal
  • Books,  Plants & Happiness

    The Leaf Your Troubles Workbook is Ready and Free!

    Leaf Your Troubles Workbook, The Leaf Your Troubles Workbook is Ready and Free!, Karen Hugg, https://karenhugg.com/2022/07/12/leaf-your-troubles-workbook/(opens in a new tab), #leafyourtroubles #workbook #greenleisure #journal #happiness #mentalhealth #stressrelief #nature

    Hey all,

    Just a quick post to let you know I’ve made and put online the Leaf Your Troubles workbook! This is a 25-page companion booklet of worksheets that dovetail with the exercises in my book, Leaf Your Troubles Behind: How to Destress and Grow Happiness Through Plants.

    What’s In There

    It’s a pretty simple format. I included Escape to Nature journal pages focusing on the Time Log exercises and Green Personality exploration. It also features a sample Stress Bramble you can add to along with daily Green Leisure worksheets.

    I round out the last section with lists of recommended plants, maybe the funnest part! I’m sharing my favorite easy shrubs for most U.S. gardens, easy-to-grow houseplants that are safe for dogs and cats, and plants that propagate simply through cutting or dividing. Plus, good plants for a rain garden!

    Speaking of rain gardens, I also include extra activities on getting more greenery in your life, both indoors and out. And so I added basic instructions on installing a community rain garden. Also, a quickie recipe for mint ice cubes that go with the cocktail recipe at the back of the Leaf Your Troubles book.

    How Do I Get It?

    What I like most of about this format is because it’s a PDF you’ll download on your own computer, you can print multiple pages of whatever page you like. If you want to do more than one Stress Bramble, you can just print two or three copies. If you like the journal worksheets, you can print as many as you like. And you can even print and share the recommended plant lists if you want to as well.

    To get your free workbook, click here. Thanks for the support. And don’t forget to rest your attention on something green today!

    Karen Hugg, sig, http://www.karenhugg.com #author #books #fiction #Paris #journal

    To buy Leaf Your Troubles Behind, click here for Amazon,

    or here for Barnes and Noble,

    here for Kobo,

    or find it at your local bookstore.

  • Plants & Happiness

    Green Scene of the Day: Relaxing Summer Blooms

    Spiraea and Alstroemeria, Green Scene of the Day: Relaxing Summer Blooms, Karen Hugg, https://karenhugg.com/2022/07/06/summer-blooms/(opens in a new tab), #summerblooms #plants #greenscene #greenleisure #spiraea #alstroemeria #flowers #summer #butterflies

    For today’s green scene of the day, I’ve chosen an image from my garden. My Crispa spiraea (Spiraea x bumalda ‘Crispa’) is an unusual spiraea because it grows these crinkly, toothy leaves, which is very unlike a spiraea. But what it shares with other spiraeas are those gorgeous summer blooms. Butterflies love their flat umbels. I also find this shrub sooo alluring.

    Plants Popping Through Each Other

    The spiraea all by itself is pretty darn cool but my peach Peruvian lilies (Alstroemeria) are pretty heavenly too. They often poke through the spiraea as they reach for sunshine (and because I often forget to stake them, haha). Isn’t that peach and yellow pattern with the tiny stripes so neat? This variety, whose specific name I don’t know, is absolutely my favorite alstroemeria. I bought it eons ago when I lived at a different house. But I brought a couple clumps of tubers to the house I live in now and they’ve flourished.

    A Color Combo to Please the Eyes

    So I thought it would be a nice bit of relaxation for you to have access to this image. I love how the deep pink puffs of the spiraea play off the smooth coral color of the alstroemeria. If you’re on a lunch break sometime, you might take three minutes out just to sit quietly and enjoy them both. Take a few deep breaths and allow your eyes to roam through this lovely little moment of nature. Hopefully, you’ll feel a bit more relaxed afterward. Cheers.


  • Plants & Happiness,  Writing

    How Journaling in Nature Creates a Happy Magic

    Bellevue Botanical Garden Waterfall, How Journaling in Nature Creates a Happy Magic, Karen Hugg, https://karenhugg.com/2022/07/05/journaling-nature/(opens in a new tab), #journaling #nature, #plants, #stressrelief, #happiness, #mentalhealth, #healingbenefits #benefits

    I’m a big advocate of journaling. Writing out one’s thoughts and feelings has enormous health benefits and helps us work out the problems of our lives. Psychologists say it helps reduce stress, boosts our mood, keeps our memory sharp, and even helps our immune system. So what’s even more interesting is how journaling in nature seems to be more powerful. Here’s why.

    It puts you in a special, out-of-time place

    Even if I journal in my backyard, I’ve taken myself out of the usual, day-to-day equation of work and my to-do lists. In nature, there are no to-do lists because nature simply exists to be what it is. So I find when I’m immersed in nature, I start to simply exist to be what I am too. I feel freer to allow my thoughts to wander and land on whatever topics they’re drawn to.

    It heightens your observational skills

    When we’re outside, we encounter a whole landscape of random sounds, sights, smells, and all else. It’s not the controlled atmosphere of an indoor environment where we’ve set the temperature and lighting. When we go into nature, we’re subjecting our bodies to a whole suite of stimuli to process. That stimuli heightens our awareness, which heightens our ability to observe and record our surroundings.

    It increases mindfulness

    Because our senses our heightened and our awareness is more alert, our ability to be mindful of our experience increases. We can smell that pine tree, see how softly the leaves wave in the breeze, hear a bird tweeting, touch the roughness of a rock, and so on. And so, because we’re more in the “here and now,” our attention begins to block out thoughts of the past or future. Our thoughts and feelings simplify, which helps us cope with whatever’s troubling us.

    It lowers stress

    And so, because our attention is more present and more focused on our immediate surroundings, we relax more quickly. We turn still and silent. There are no advertisements wanting something from us, no social media to make us feel anger or angst, no traffic getting in our way. The random wild thoughts zinging through our head weaken and a deeper sense of restfulness blossoms. That, in turn, reduces our heart rate and lowers our blood pressure, creating a soothing feeling of peace.

    It creates more curiosity

    If you’re journaling indoors, you may be in your home or a local cafe. This means you know your surroundings well. But when journaling in nature, you may notice a woodland flower you’ve never noticed before, or wonder about the lake you’re sitting beside. These features of nature may create questions. What is that flower? How deep is that lake? And the more curious you become, the more you’ll learn, thus feeding your mind and creating a tiny sense of accomplishment that boosts confidence.

    Conclusion

    I’ve found journaling in nature relaxes me much more than when I journal in my home. Even if I’m working out angsty problems that relate to my day-to-day work and life, I’m less sucked in emotionally by it. I gain a useful, detached perspective that serves me well when I go back in. Plus, whatever insights or conclusions I’ve gained feel like icing on the cake. And that in turn, makes me feel more grateful for the life I have.

    Do you ever journal in nature? If you do, let me know how! I’m always looking for ideas.